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Research news

Low Vitamin B6 Linked to Higher Risk of Stroke
30 June 2003
by Wyn Snow, Managing Editor

Researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School have investigated the relationship between strokes and levels of both vitamin B6 and homocystine in patients' blood.

In 1998, the US began fortifying cereal grains with folate. One result has been the lowering of homocystine levels in the population at large. The researchers wanted to know the impact of such fortification on the occurrence of strokes.

The study compared patients suffering from both strokes and transient ischemic attacks (temporary blockage of artery) with matched controls. They found that serum levels of vitamin B6 among the stroke patients were less than half that of the control group—a correlation of very strong significance (P<0.0001). Serum levels of homocystine in the two groups were not significantly different.

Source

P. J. Kelly et al. Abstract of "Transient Ischemic Attack in the Era of Folic Acid Grain Fortification." Stroke, Vol 34, No 6, pages E51-4, June 2003. On PubMed: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&
db=PubMed&list_uids=12738890&dopt=Abstract
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